Posts

Showing posts from November, 2019

Planting the Mangrove Forest

Image
Mangroves are woody trees or shrubs belonging to several plant families. Their lifestyle allows them to live along tropical coastlines and the banks of rivers where salt and freshwater intermingle. Growing in dense stands and forests, tropical mangrove habitats are critical to provide proper ecosystem functions, the creation of new land, and in mitigating the effects of storms, flooding, and other disruptive effects of rising sea levels.
 
Each species commonly grouped together under the mangrove lifestyle has differing tolerances to saltwater; they use various strategies to block absorption or to excrete dangerous salt from their tissues. They also grow in slightly different environments. Mangroves don’t need saltwater to live, they just tolerate it much better than other plants. It’s a great advantage and an evolutionary strategy that rids them of competitors. Some must have primarily freshwater or water that is only slightly brackish to survive. Other mangroves are found closer to…

The Mangrove Palm

Image
"If there are no mangrove forests, then the sea will have no meaning. It is like having a tree with no roots, for the mangroves are the roots of the sea."

 Unknown fisherman, Trang Province, Southern Thailand 
Mangroves are woody trees or shrubs that are salt-tolerant and grow along coasts in tropical and subtropical regions. Their distinctive and ecologically important communities consist of members of a number of plant families. Mangrove species can be said to have a common lifestyle, rather than being taxonomically related. The Nipa Palm, Nypa fruticans, is naturally distributed along Asian and Northern Australian rivers and brackish estuarian environments, often in dense stands that can extend for miles. In many areas the palm is a significant and sometimes dominant component of mangrove forests. It’s quite unusual, as palms go. Characteristic of the species is its mild salinity tolerance, which is generally uncommon among palms. The trees develop subterranean, horizontally…

The Strangest Plant on Earth

Image
 “He wrote that he was so astonished that he knelt on the hot sand in bewilderment, thinking that his fantasies had taken flight.” Chris Bornman, describing the reaction of Friedrich Welwitsch upon seeing Welwitschia mirabilis for the first time.

A fine candidate for the most world’s most biologically unique plant, Welwitschia mirabilis is the sole member of the family Welwitschiaceae. This strange cone-bearing plant was first brought to the attention of science by the plant explorer for whom it was named.


Friedrich Welwitsch was an Austrian, trained in medicine and botany, who disappointed his parents by not developing a law career. Instead, after briefly working as a physician, he pursued his interests in plants, working for important botanical gardens in Portugal and England. His African explorations resulted in the discovery of several new species. Welwitsch died in 1872 but left a fine collection of many thousands of dried herbarium specimens. Three hundred and twenty nine speci…